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Dairy

Videometer Technology for Dairy Analysis

The Videometer technologies can be used for different types of analysis, in order to have a comprehensive assessment of dairy products throughout the supply chain. The Videometer technology is non-destructive and documented, offering an objective and reproducible methodologie for your quality assessments. 

Color 

With the VideometerLab you can differentiate colors in your milk powder to assess the presence of burned particles. 

Syneresis

The VideometerLiq can be utilised for the detection of syneresis in dairy products and its percentage.  

Stability

The VideometerLiq offers stability test for dairy products by detecting bubbles, particles, marbling and irregular layers. 

Texture

With the Videometer SLS, you can analyse the texture of your dairy products, for example during fermentation processes to control it.

Discover the VideometerLiq for dairy analysis.

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Milk Powder Color Analysis

With VideometerLab, you are able to distinguish colors which for the naked eye seem to be the same. Spectral imaging technology will help you with quality control and production improvements.

milk powder color changes
Milk Powder Analysis

Discover Burnt Particles in Powder

On the left image shows sRGB close-up with burned marked in milk powder sample.

Oxidation of Milk

oxidation of milk powder

Videometer can detect oxidation of milk by hexanal training set.

oxidation hexanal training milk powder

Melamine Detection

With the standard fluorescence filters we see a lot of fluorescence on the milk powder but no fluorescent signal in melamine that is stronger than the signal from the milk powder. Thus we have to look for absence of fluorescence to detect melamine which is not optimal compared to looking for presence. There is an extremely clear spectral reflectance difference between the two extremes of the scale: milk powder and melamine.

Spoon Detection in Empty Can

With the right illumination and optics it is possible to robustly detect spoon presence in the empty and very glossy can.